3
$\begingroup$

Here is the source of a code block:

```python
import math

print("test")
```

it looks like this when rendered; note the triple ticks don't show (correctly):

import math
    
print("test")

If I put it at the end of a post, without a newline character after the closing triple ticks, the triple ticks render in the message. Here is a screenshot:

enter image description here

and here it is happening in practice:

import math
    
print("test")
```
$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ weird. It seems to happen here but not on any of the other sites I tried (SO, physics, math). $\endgroup$
    – glS Mod
    Commented Jun 11 at 7:50

1 Answer 1

0
$\begingroup$

I think this is network-wide. The comment by glS says that it doesn't happen on Physics.SE, but you can see here that it does. I have also experienced this many times over the years.

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ I guess it might be browser specific or depend on other factors then. I don't get it on physics: i.sstatic.net/yramxuG0.png. Actually, checking again, I get it on answers but not on questions, on physics. But eg on StackOverflow I don't get it on either $\endgroup$
    – glS Mod
    Commented Jun 12 at 12:03
  • $\begingroup$ That screenshot doesn't demonstrate that you've tested it correctly. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 12 at 12:27
  • $\begingroup$ what does "tested it correctly" mean here? I just copy-pasted Craig's question.. was there something else to check? $\endgroup$
    – glS Mod
    Commented Jun 12 at 12:59
  • $\begingroup$ Your screenshot is extremely confusing. It doesn't show which site is being tested (the screenshot in my answer makes it clear that I was testing Physics.SE). The screenshot within your screenshot, is from QCSE right? That makes things doubly confusing. Also, was it a question or an answer? You said that this makes a difference. Maybe you're 100% sure that you didn't forget to switch between QCSE and Physics, but from the standpoint of an experiment, it doesn't show the reader what is being tested, to the point where they'd have to re-do the experiment from scratch to figure out what you did. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 13 at 0:35

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